Double Weave duet Sampler bag

Duet Sampler Double Weave

The double weave sampler & bread bag are featured in the Double Weave on 4-Shafts course.

 This sampler warp gives you an opportunity to test out different ways of weaving double weave—as two layers, switching layers, as double-width, and as a tube. Once you’re ready, weave the remainder of the warp to make a linen/cotton bread bag or dishtowel.

Duet Sampler by Felicia Lo

Skill Level: Intermediate

Finished Measurements

  • 12 1/2” / 32 cm wide x 19 1/2” / 49.5 cm long, relaxed, off the loom and before washing
  • 11 1/2” / 29 cm wide x 17 1/2” / 44.5 cm long, after washing and sewing both ends

Yarn

  •  Warp & Weft: 1 cone each of Gist Duet in Rust (A) and Marble (B) (600 yards / 548 m per 4 oz / 115 g cone; 55% European Tow Linen, 45% USA-Grown Cotton).
  • 1 yard / 91 cm of 1/8” / 3 mm diameter cotton cord for drawstring, contrasting waste yarn to separate sampler from project

Equipment & Tools

  • Loom: 4-shaft loom with a minimum 15″ / 38 cm weaving width, 12-dent reed
  • Tools: 2 shuttles and 2 bobbins, scissors
  • Sewing: serger, sewing machine, and/or needle and thread

Structure

  • Weave Structure: plain weave woven as a tube and double-width
  • Warp Length: 1.63 yd / 1.49 m long (includes approx 12″ / 30 cm take-up, 20″ / 51 cm loom waste)
  • Warp Ends: 320
  • Ends Per Inch (EPI): 12 per layer
  • Picks Per Inch (PPI): 12
  • Width in Reed: 13 1/4

Related Articles

Those Pesky Numbers

New weavers sometimes have a bit of a challenge coming to grips with the numbering systems used to identify their yarns, and Laura explains all the info needed to break down those pesky number counts.

Lacy Squares + Runner Rigid Heddle Pattern

For this project we’ll explore pick-up sticks and learn how to use warp and weft floats on their own and in combination. We’ll make five samples that would make lovely table squares. Then you can choose a structure you have woven and expand it into a table runner on a second wider warp.

Breakfast Eggs Towels Pattern

The first warp uses an easy all over houndstooth colour sequence leaving areas of solid yellow and white just like you would have in a fried egg and the second shows you how to use just a bit of striping to create a colour and weave highlight in the corner of your towels with a more muted scrambled egg palette where buttery and deep yellow combine. Mix and match and make them your own.

Tapestry Looms

In the second article of this Building Confidence in Tapestry series, we are talking about tapestry looms; what to look for, the pros and cons of the tapestry looms on the market today, as well as some great DIY options.

Powered By MemberPress WooCommerce Plus Integration